Catching up with MQG member Charlotte Newland, winner of the Great British Sewing Bee

WARNING: Embargoed for publication until 00:00:01 on 10/05/2016 - Programme Name: The Great British Sewing Bee - TX: n/a - Episode: n/a (No. Generics) - Picture Shows: Charlotte - (C) Love Productions - Photographer: Charlotte Medlicott

Photo courtesy of Love Productions/BBC

If you’ve been watching the BBC’s television show Great British Sewing Bee, you probably know Charlotte Newland, who was announced as the winner on July 4! Charlotte is an individual MQG member from London, and one of 10 contestants on this year’s show. She made it through eight weeks of tough sewing challenges to become Britain’s best amateur sewer of 2016. We caught up with Charlotte to talk about the Bee, modern quilting, QuiltCon and the MQG.

Hi Charlotte — and congrats! We’re so excited for you. When did you decide you wanted to apply to be on the show?

My kids and I had always watched the show together, and last season my girls in particular kept telling me I should apply. They were so excited to see that applications were open, and made sure I filled in the form!

What happened when they told you you had been accepted?

The application process was pretty drawn out — there were several stages to go through and it was about four months before I heard I had been accepted. By that time I had gotten to know the people in the production company pretty well, so when they called with the news there was a lot of excited squealing.

The Great British Sewing Bee

(L-R) Joyce, Charlotte, Jade the moment Charlotte was announced as the winner – (C) Love Productions/BBC – Photographer: Charlotte Medlicott

Did you watch the episodes as they were airing? Any funny fan moments that happened as the show progressed?

I watched the episodes as they were shown, every week. It was really interesting to see the bits that we hadn’t been aware of at the time, like the judges’ discussions. The editing team did an amazing job cutting down probably 100 hours of footage into a one hour show. I did get recognised from about episode two. I was walking across Tower Bridge one day and someone called out “Oooh! You’re the lady from the sewing bee!” It was so strange to be recognised!

WARNING: Embargoed for publication until 22:00:01 on 27/06/2016 - Programme Name: The Great British Sewing Bee - TX: 04/07/2016 - Episode: n/a (No. 8 - The Final) - Picture Shows: **STRICTLY EMBARGOED UNTIL MONDAY 27TH JUNE 2016 AT 22:00HRS** Charlotte - (C) Love Productions - Photographer: Charlotte Medlicott

Charlotte sews a garment during the show. – (C) Love Productions/BBC – Photographer: Charlotte Medlicott

Does your quilt experience influence the way you design and create garments? 

It was definitely an advantage to have good rotary cutting skills, especially bearing in mind that the challenges were timed. Pinning and using scissors is so much more time consuming than using weights and a rotary cutter. It’s also a lot more accurate when cutting out stretch or delicate fabrics. Rotary cutting FTW!

During the ’60s week, your color block dress was lovely! And very reminiscent of a modern quilt… The judges were also impressed that you were trying out your fabrics ahead of time. Is that a quilter technique? Did any of the other challenges require you to reach into your quilting bag of tricks?

Using fabric scraps to test out colour placement in the Mondrian dress challenge just made sense to me. It’s definitely something that I did because of my quilting background. I use a design wall a lot in my quilting, and this was a teeny version of the same concept.

The time I’ve spent matching HST seams also stood me in good stead in the chevron top challenge in the first week!

Is your garment design style similar to your quilt style?

I am primarily an improv quilter, and I think that the “chop it up randomly and sew it back together” approach was really helpful in the alteration challenge, particularly with the duvet cover in the semi final.

What was it like being critiqued by Esme and Patrick?

As an amateur sewer I’ve never been critiqued before (apart from by myself, of course!), and it took a bit of getting used to. The judges were extremely fair in all their comments, though, and really kind about how they said things even when there were serious issues. Getting a good review felt amazing – like winning a prize!

It seemed like all the contestants became good friends during the season! Are any of them also quilters?

We had so much fun in the sewing room, and we learned so much from each other. Because we are all amateurs we each had a different approach, so there was a lot of skill sharing. I love them all to bits, and wish that we lived closer. Joyce is the only other quilter in the group.

WARNING: Embargoed for publication until 00:00:01 on 10/05/2016 - Programme Name: The Great British Sewing Bee - TX: n/a - Episode: n/a (No. Generics) - Picture Shows: (L-R) Rumana, Angeline, Duncan, Charlotte, Patrick Grant, Esme Young, Josh, Jade, Claudia Winkleman, Tracey, Joyce, Jamie, Ghislaine - (C) Love Productions - Photographer: Charlotte Medlicott

(L-R) Rumana, Angeline, Duncan, Charlotte, Patrick Grant, Esme Young, Josh, Jade, Claudia Winkleman, Tracey, Joyce, Jamie, Ghislaine – (C) Love Productions/BBC – Photographer: Charlotte Medlicott

The MQG community has been cheering you on the whole season — what was it like knowing that 10,000 people were rooting for you?

Having the support of so many people from the quilting community was wonderful! Quilters are the best🙂

You were going to attend QuiltCon last year, but couldn’t because of filming. What was your reaction when you found out the two would overlap?

I couldn’t believe it when I found out that filming would coincide with QuiltCon! I was so looking forward to coming to Pasadena, it was crazy that both things happened at the same time!

Are you working on any quilts or is it just garments for the time being?

I’m working on a solids improv quilt inspired by the art of Sonia Delauney. It’s been a bit neglected over the last few months, but I hope to get some work done on over the summer. I’ve also got loads of clothes I want to make, including a new swimsuit.

What do you plan to do with your sewing time now that you’ve won the Bee?

I am looking forward to sewing just for me again. During the Bee there really was no time to sew anything for myself.

Will we see you at QuiltCon 2017 in Savannah?

I plan to be there as crew — I’m just looking into flights now!

What is the best part of being an MQG member?

The MQG community! I’ve met so many fantastic people online and in real life, and everyone is so supportive. It’s really wonderful!

WARNING: Embargoed for publication until 22:00:01 on 04/07/2016 - Programme Name: The Great British Sewing Bee - TX: 04/07/2016 - Episode: n/a (No. 8 - The Final) - Picture Shows: **STRICTLY EMBARGOED UNTIL MONDAY 4TH JULY 2016 AT 22:00HRS** (L-R) Claudia Winkleman, Esme Young, Charlotte, Patrick Grant - (C) Love Productions - Photographer: Charlotte Medlicott

(L-R) Claudia Winkleman, Esme Young, Charlotte, Patrick Grant – (C) Love Productions/BBC – Photographer: Charlotte Medlicott

QuiltCon Charity Quilt Spotlight: Postcards from North Caroline by the Charlotte MQG

by Elizabeth Busscher, Vice President, 2015

Full_View_Postcards

First off, please let me say how proud I am of all the members who contributed to this quilt. When I proposed this project, I got some grumblings from the group.  Apparently, improv quilting is not our favorite! But, I think we all can agree – the end product was totally worth it!

To prepare for this challenge, our guild reviewed some basic improv techniques by watching the MQG webinar “Improv with Intent” and discussing how we as individuals could create blocks that were improvisational, but still form a cohesive quilt. We decided a quilt with six individual blocks, each with its own theme would work best for our group.

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At our September meeting, we brainstormed the themes for each block, all to be captured under the umbrella “Postcards from North Carolina.” The six ideas represented are:

  1. Beach
  2. Mountains
  3. Sports
  4. Fields/agriculture
  5. Charlotte City
  6. State bird/flower

From there the guild broke up into six teams and created individual postcards. This was a great program for our guild as it allowed for sewing time, and time to get to know other members. We also very quickly learned who was not a fan of unstructured cutting and sewing – me for one!  It was definitely a challenge for some of us. Others had issues with the limited color palette, but we all got over our fears quickly. 

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At the October meeting, we revealed each group’s finished block. It was wonderful to see those piles of fabric turn into six finished blocks. A big thanks to Keleigh for taking all the blocks home and making them into the finished quilt top. (And for free piecing all those letters!)

Postcards_Lettering
And another big thanks to Vicki for quilting and binding. It looks amazing!

When this quilt returns from the show, we plan to vote on a charity that will receive it. I’m sure whoever the final recipient is will treasure it. I know I’m honored to have been part of the group who made it.

QuiltCon Charity Quilt Spotlight: “Milky Way the Modern Way” by the Portland MQG Hillsboro Carpool Group

by AnnMarie Cowley, member

Quilt_Front

The Hillsboro carpool gals (eight of us from Portland MQG and one deserter now with San Antonio MQG) agreed to do this challenge, and once we decided to make improv stars, off we went. One of us purchased Kona solids per the predetermined color palette. Each of us could add any solid or print that matched the chosen colors and made three stars each finishing at 3.5″, 6.5″ and 9.5″. PMQG has Sew Days at Fabric Depot, so we met two consecutive months with a plan in mind, then one last time at a member’s home. One member made the back from scraps, another quilted it, and then another bound and applied the sleeve.

PMQG_Sew_Day_Gals (1)

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Annie_floor

Probably the thing we learned in this challenge was about each other. Our carpool ride is usually 1.75 hours getting to the meetings, and an hour back, but we spent a lot more time together on this quilt. It was great having one member not sewing and moving the blocks around and giving direction. Occasionally, we would all break and get a consensus.

For me, I love the name of the quilt and that we met the deadline and will get to show it off at PMQG next Thursday. Important to all of us was to use fabric from fellow PMQG members: Elizabeth Hartman, Mo Bedel, Violet Craft and Monica Solorio-Snow.

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QuiltCon Charity Quilt Spotlight: Beach Blanket Improv by the South Florida MQG

By Allison Schnackenberg, President

SFMQG-QCCQ-HERO
South Florida MQG is a newly formalized guild — we took the leap and joined the MQG midway through 2015. Prior to that we were an informal group meeting once a month in our local quilt shop, the wonderful Stitchcraft of Boca Raton. Most of our members are new to modern quilting, coming either from a traditional quilting background, or being entirely new to quilting. Our very first workshop was an improv round robin, and it was a joy to see the gusto with which everyone abandoned their rulers and threw themselves into improv! So we were pretty excited about the idea of a group improv with intent for this challenge.

SFMQG covers a large land mass — a part of Florida that stretches from Palm City to Miami! Due to our members being so spread out, it can be a challenge to organize time to work together as a group on a sewing project. For this reason, we decided to work on individual pieces of the quilt. Many of us have been profoundly influenced by Sherri Lynn Wood’s wonderful Improv Handbook, and following her lead, we identified the steps we wanted to follow for this project.

Curating our fabrics

In fact, the first step was done for us by the MQG — the colors, which were part of the challenge framework. 

Find inspiration
These colors really spoke to us: a Florida sunset! We have glorious, dramatic sunsets in this part of the world – the blue skies melding into the golden and crimson sun on the dark horizon over the sea. The colors were a gift for us! 

Set limits
We then limited ourselves to five colors, and we restricted our patchwork size by limiting the amount of fabric available to each participant (a fat eighth of each color).

SFMQG-QCC-2015-12-36

Defining our process
An important part of the process for us was to make it easy for everyone to participate. For many of our members, working on this quilt would be their very first hands-on attempt at improv. I gave a presentation at a meeting which was aimed at removing some of the fear and loosening up the death-grips on those rulers. I then devised a step-by-step process for the patchwork which I hoped would make everyone comfortable. The instructions were specific enough to give the terrified a guide rope, but loose enough to allow the more confident to base jump right into the wild blue yonder. I deliberately did not include any photographs with the instructions, or post any tutorial photos, because I wanted imagination to take flight. We simply used that inspirational sunset as our guide, and used our scissors to create shapes to build our patchwork.

SFMQG-QCC-2015-12-33

I can not tell you how dumbfounded I was at our November meeting, as block after beautiful block turned up on the design board. A glorious wall full of colorful, abstract, improvised sunsets! As a guild, we knocked it out of the park.

For our December meeting, we spent the entire afternoon sewing. We are lucky to have Tonya Ricucci, the Unruly Quilter and a master of improvisational piecing, in our guild. Tonya led the group in charge of devising a layout. They simply starting putting pieces together like a puzzle, fitting one patchwork section to another and building our quilt top. Another group improv-pieced a back for the quilt from the leftover fabric used for the top. A third group cut and prepared binding. We had two members pressing everything as we went. We pieced the top and back together that afternoon. Our talented member Patti Auten did the free motion quilting in the following weeks. Charlotte Noll and Kerrilyn O’Rourke lent their talents to sew the binding and sleeve.

SFMQG-QCC-2015-12-35

It fills my heart with joy to see a such a new guild come together and complete this project. So much fearless creativity was harnessed and devoted to the completion of our quilt. I hope that the visitors to QuiltCon enjoyed our work as much as we have enjoyed seeing the beautiful creations made by other modern guilds. There is something truly special about feeling part of a project that so many people around the globe have also been a part of. Thanks to the MQG for making this wonderful project possible!

QuiltCon Charity Quilt Spotlight: “Sew Pieceful Together in the Desert” by the Phoenix MQG

By Bonnie Bobman, Quiltcon Charity Quilt Project Manager

After reviewing the MQG prompts and video, the PHXmqg discussed what “Improv with Intent” means to us. We talked about the challenge that improvisational quilting brings to many sewing tables. We found that only one of our members truly worked with an improvisational direction in her quilting. More importantly was that many of the members were eager to learn but never knew how to approach this fantastic method! 

PHXmqgQuiltcon16CharityHeroShot
Our intent for the Quiltcon charity quilt journey was to take this wonderful opportunity to learn together and join our many varied backgrounds and improvising our way to become one solid, cohesive group.

One member led a workshop on improv quilting as well as provided a home video where we could see the process and revisit the clip any time. The most important part of the process was to let go, have fun and, of course, have no rules! We tried to be concerned with only the moment and not so much the outcome. It’s easier to reign yourself back in but it is so much harder to break down the structure on our conventional quilt piecing.

PHXmqgCharityPic1

During our workshop, everyone was instructed to bring only rotary cutters and self-healing mats. Making that first random cut without a ruler was probably the most challenging step for those new to improv piecing. But once the first unmeasured cut was complete, the next came easier, and those that followed were even better! We experimented with curves, slicing, dicing and using tiny bits to create larger pieced segments. You could see the relieved, surprised and excited expressions of accomplishment all around the room!

phxmqgcharitycenter

We had collected close to fifteen miscellaneous sized blocks. The project manager had permission to put them together and fill in the gaps to create one focus “fabric” for the quilt top. In the true improv method, the final design came from playing with the fabric until it reflected the group’s direction — togetherness.

Once the top and back was complete, the quilting was balanced and simple. The quilt went to another member for binding where she had full reign to do what she liked. Finishing touches of the sleeve and label were done by our final member. 

phxmqglongarm
We strive to have a learning environment within our guild; sharing our boundless talents and insights from all of our members. This group challenge was just one of many creative projects we have here in our Arizona guild. Our intent was to reach a very important, intangible and supremely crucial goal for our guild: to create a sense of cohesiveness within a chapter that is blessed with wonderful members from so many places — Alaska to Mexico, Connecticut to California. We are indeed a living form of a “quilt in the desert”!

More pictures on phoenixmodernquiltguild.com.

QuiltCon Charity Quilt Spotlight: “An Exercise in Trust” by the Denver MQG

By Andrea Berryhill, President

Last year the Modern Quilt Guild threw out a challenge for the 2016 charity quilts to be displayed in Pasadena. The challenge required participants to “work collaboratively to create completed quilts using a predetermined color palette and improv with intent.” Several members of the Denver Metro guild know a thing or two about improv, so we were eager to accept the challenge!

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The first step in our process was to choose a theme around which to construct our quilt so that it would still be cohesive. The theme that was settled on was “Trust.” Specifically, how does trust come into play when making a collaborative quilt?

We trusted the MQG in their choice of colors, which included several neutrals and a few primary colors. Participants were then instructed to make an improvisational block using the neutral colors for their negative space and a simple four-sided shape with the black color trusting that there would be more direction to come. The third step was to put the pieced blocks into a bag, mix them up and draw out new blocks. Those blocks could then be altered using small amounts of the secondary colors using improvisation, curved piecing, slice and insert or whatever moved the maker, trusting the process while working together. Finally, the blocks were laid out with the intention of creating a focal point and some visual interest and movement through the use of the secondary colors and quilting. I think the result is a stunning success!

An interesting point to make is that many of these blocks were turned on their corners in order to create the movement of the smaller secondary colored curves. It was like putting together a puzzle for which there was no picture. There are a lot of Y-seams in this baby!

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Let’s face it, improv can be intimidating for a lot of us quilters. We tend to like order, and lines, and rulers! However, when you quilt with intention, basing your ideas off of a set of guidelines it takes some of the intimidation off the table and turns out to be a lot of fun. We loved seeing how all the blocks, as different as they were, still fit together (in our minds) perfectly! We’re not sure yet where we’ll be donating our quilt, but we hope that it makes the recipient smile.

charity_quilt_2

The women of the Denver Metro Modern Quilt Guild would like to give the following members thanks for their participation: Andrea Berryhill, Alaina Marler, Marsha Loewenberg, Chelsea O’Hayre, Katie Rapp, Shelby Skumanich, Rosalynda Turner, Amy Wade, and Emily Voytek. We would like to especially thank Stephanie Ruyle for trusting us with an amazing design concept and working on final construction, Wendy Bermingham and Christine Perrigo for the many hours of assembly, creating the back and the amazing quilting, Susan Sanstistevan for heading up the committee and Judy Sanclaria for binding the quilt. What a beautiful collaboration!

Congratulations to our QuiltCon 2016 winners!

The competition was fierce this year, but these quilts stood above the rest. Congratulations to our 2016 QuiltCon winners!

Best in show

My Brother’s Jeans
Pieced & quilted by Melissa Averinos
Individual Member
@melissaaverinos
84” x 91”

averinos_my_overall_1603

Machine Quilting, Framed

No Value Does Not Equal Free
Pieced by Molli Sparkles, quilted by Jane Davidson
Individual Member
@molli_sparkles
72” x 72”

sparkles_no_overall_348

Machine Quilting, Frameless

ABQMQG
Logo designed by Bob Lowe
Pieced by Lois Warwick
Applique by Sally Williams & Laurie Moodie
Quilting by Renee Hoffman
Albuquerque MQG
86” x 45”

hoffman_abqmqg_overall_1406

Freespirit Quilting Excellence

The Other Side
Pieced & quilted by Carson Converse
Northampton MQG
59” x 57”

converse_the_overall_1712

Judge’s Choice – Cheryl Arkison

Better Together
Pieced & quilted by Laura West Kong
Individual Member
@laurawestkong

west_kong_better_overall_1838

People’s Choice & Judge’s Choice – Scott Murkin

Mr. Swirl E. Bones
Pieced by Victoria Findlay Wolfe, quilted by Shelly Pagliai
Individual Member
@victoriafindlaywolfe
94” x 94”

findlay_wolfe_mr._overall_700

Judge’s Choice – Lisa

Red Hot
Pieced & quilted by Shawna Doering
Individual Member
@thequilticorn
55” x 66”

doering_red_overall_1897

Applique – 1st

DripnSplash
Pieced & quilted by
Katherine Jones
Tasmanian MQG
84” x 60”

jones_dripnsplash_overall_906

Applique – 2nd

Ebb
Pieced & quilted by Carolyn Friedlander
Individual Member
@carolynfriedlander
41” x 36″

friedlander_ebb_overall_723

Applique – 3rd

Cut & Keep
Pieced & quilted by Gina Pina
Austin MQG
@gina_pina
37” x 44”

pina_cut_overall_1930

EZ Triangle Challenge – 1st

Eichler Homes
Pieced by Mickey Beebe
Quilted by Tami Levin, the Quilted Lemon
South Bay Area MQG
66” x 76”

beebe_eichler_overall_629

EZ Triangle Challenge – 2nd

Catnado
Pieced & quilted by Karen Duling
Individual Member
@karenbduling
56” x 61”

duling_catnado_overall_257

EZ Triangle Challenge – 3rd

Facets
Pieced & quilted by Katherine Jones
Tasmanian MQG
25” x 37”

jones_facets_overall_912

Group or Bee Quilts – 1st

Mod Mood
Pieced by Debbie Jeske, Stephanie Ruyle, Leanne Chahley, Karen Foster, Felicity Ronaghan, Kari Vojtechovsky, Melissa Richie, Diane Stanley, Marci Debetaz, Hillary Goodwin
Quilted by Debbie Jeske
62” x 65”

jeske_mod_overall_554

Group or Bee Quilts – 2nd

Pathways
Pieced by Janet Schoenfeld, Summer Rankin, Elaine Wienholt, Cindy Barcelles, Deb Kleiner, Judy Dunlap
Quilted by Maria O’Haver
Baltimore MQG
77” x 73”

schoenfeld_pathways_overall_1240

Group or Bee Quilts – 3rd

Twisted Sisters Quilt
Pieced by Stephanie Ruyle, Christine Perrigo, Wendy Bermingham, Amy Wade, Chelsea Camalick, Sheri Nichols, Michelle Davis, Wendy Roth, Teri Ladtkow, Susan Santisteven, Charlayne Dunn, Shelby Skumanich, Andrea Berryhill, Teresa Barbagallo, Lauren Lang, Dena Mehling, Anne deister, Katie Rapp, Carla Keahey, Marsha Loewenbery, Judy Sanclaria, Heather Ferguson)
Quilted by Wendy Bermingham, Christine Perrigo
Denver Metro MQG
78” x 88”

87twistedsisters

Handwork – 1st

Places Unfold
Pieced & quilted by Heidi Parkes
Individual Member
@heidi.parkes
59” x 59”

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Handwork – 2nd

Double Wedding Ring
Pieced & quilted by Tara Faughnan
Individual Member
@tarafaughnan
78” x 78”

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Handwork – 3rd

Mod Mountains
Pieced & quilted by Susanne Williams
Individual Member
@suzyquilts
50” x 64”

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Improvisation – 1st

The One For Eric
Pieced by Chawne Kimber
Hand quilting by Chawne Kimber, longarm machine quilting by Pamela J. Cole
Individual Member
@cauchycomplete
79” x 77”

kimber_the_overall_900

Improvisation – 2nd

Night Flight no. 1
Pieced & quilted by Heidi Parkes
Individual Member
@heidi.parkes
58” x 58”

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Improvisation – 3rd

Colorfall
Pieced & quilted by Timna Tarr
Northampton MQG
@timnatarr
49” x 54”

Colorfall

Michael Miller Challenge – 1st

The Stars Dream of Snow
Pieced & quilted by Kari Anderson
Los Angeles MQG
@Andersondesignworks
62” x 58”

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Michael Miller Challenge – 2nd

Pineapple Glitz
Pieced & quilted by Susan Slusser Clay
Individual Member
@slusclay
62” x 62”

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Michael Miller Challenge – 3rd

Better Together
Pieced & quilted by Laura West Kong
Individual Member
@laurawestkong
54” x 54”

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Minimalist Design – 1st

Bubble Gum
Pieced & quilted by Margaret (Kathy) Greer
Bainbridge Island MQG
58” x 72”

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Minimalist Design – 2nd

Shift
Pieced & quilted by Carson Converse
Northampton MQG
37.5” x 41”

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Minimalist Design – 3rd

Rainy Day Quilt
Pieced by Lindsey Neill
Quilted by Sarah Wilson from Crinklelove
Phoenix MQG
@penandpaperpatterns
56” x 72”

SONY DSC

Modern Traditionalism – 1st

Whimsical Logs
Pieced by Letitia Chung
Machine quilted by Laurie Grant
Sashiko by Letitia Chung
Individual Member
66” x 67”

261whimsicallogs

Modern Traditionalism – 2nd

Flounce
Pieced & quilted by Melanie Tuazon
North Jersey MQG
@melintheattic
52” x 57”

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Modern Traditionalism – 3rd

Release the Geese II
Pieced by Sarah Bond
Quilted by Carol Heisler, Norriton, Pennsylvania
Philadelphia MQG
@slbphilly
94” x 94”

www.id-photo-app.com

Piecing – 1st

Under the Radar
Pieced & quilted by Corinne Sovey
Austin MQG
@mustlovequilts
47.8” x 65”

UndertheRadar

Piecing – 2nd

Pointed Statement
Pieced & quilted by Amy Friend
Seacoast MQG
@duringquiettime
48” x 60”

friend_pointed_overall_78

Piecing – 3rd

Diamonds Quilt #2
Pieced & quilted by Tara Faughnan
Individual Member
@tarafaughnan
59” x 69”

faughnan_diamonds_overall_310

Small Quilts – 1st

Modern Improv Sampler
Pieced & quilted by Kristin Shields
Central Oregon MQG
@kristinshields
17” x 24”

shields_modern_overall_579

Small Quilts – 2nd

Lines Lost & Found
Pieced & quilted by Jennifer Rossotti
Individual Member
@jennrossotti
35” x 28”

rossotti_lines_overall_303

Small Quilts – 3rd

Holyoke 1938
Pieced & quilted by Timna Tarr
Northampton MQG
@timnatarr
22” x 29”

Holyoke 1938

Use of Negative Space – 1st

Reflection
Pieced by Nancy Purvis
Quilted by Mary Gregory
Triangle MQG
@owensolivia
37” x 47”

purvis_reflection_overall_1059

Use of Negative Space – 2nd

Horseshoes and Hand Grenades
Pieced & quilted by Rebecca Burnett
Toronto MQG
@duzzabear
63” x 85”

burnett_horseshoes_overall_1253

Use of Negative Space – 3rd

Catching Up
Pieced by Kathryn Simel
Quilted by Stacey Bendure
Maine MQG
@midcoastcottagedesign
68” x 84”

182catchingup

Youth – 1st

Ka-Bloom
Pieced & quilted by Sofia Locke
Sydney MQG
@craftypanda55
51” x 51”

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Youth – 2nd

Hearts Desire
Pieced by Autumn Overton
Quilted by Autumn Overton & her teacher Mrs. Goodman
Junior MQG of Broward County
57” x 94”

overton_hearts_overall_1069

Youth – 3rd

Modern Harris
Pieced & quilted by Alexus Upitis
Calgary MQG
41” x 43”

1895modernharris

MQG Exhibit at International Quilt Festival

 

One of the great things about going to Quilt Market is getting the first peek at the MQG showcase at the International Quilt Festival! We had a stellar show this year with lots of diverse modern quilts. The photos below give a nice overview on how the show looks and feels. Best of all, all of these quilts will make an appearance at QuiltCon in Pasadena!

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From L to R: Big Love by Sheri Cifaldi-Morrill, Comma Comet by Pam Biswas

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From L to R: Tidy Towns: Irish Houses by Andrew Steinbrecher, Modern Amish II by Mickey Beebe

 

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From L to R: Line Study #1 by Andrew Steinbrecher, Balancing Act by Amanda Hohnstreiter, Bullseye by Vicki Ruebel

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From L to R: Paper Cranes by Sylvia Schaefer, Huckleberry by Rebecca Bryan

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From L to R: Spare Change by Betsy Vinegrad, Pineapple Variation by Alexis Deise

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From L to R: Twisted Sisters Quilt by Stephanie Z. Ruyle, Fruit Flavors by Mary A. Menzer

 

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From L to R: 5/325 by Hillary Goodwin, Embers by Stephanie Z. Ruyle

 

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From L to R: Kintsugi I (Medallion) by Alexis Deise, Life in the ER Quilt by Hillary Goodwin

 

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From L to R: Trimmings 2015 – The Cog by Amy Gunson, Pointed Statement by Amy B. Friend, Echoes by Leanne M. Chahley

 

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From L to R: When Oceans Rise by Amanda Hohnstreiter, Corsage by Stacey Day

 

 

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From L to R: Wavelength by Rebecca Bryan, Pixels by Ashley Nickels

 

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From L to R: Rain by Christa Watson, Random Perfection by Wanda A Dotson

 

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From L to R: Home by Jessica Skultety, Puddling by Amy B Friend, Diamonds in the Rough by Tina Guthmann

 

 

QuiltCon Charity Quilt Spotlight: Ann Arbor MQG

Ann Arbor Modern Quilt Guild (A2MQG)

The Ann Arbor Quilt Guild was very excited to participate in the QuiltCon Charity Quilt Challenge! We had enough interested participants that we decided to split into two groups: one where members would piece blocks based on a pattern, and another where members would piece blocks in an improvisational manner.

The improv team started with an idea: a quilt inspired by ideas! Arrows swarming and circulating represent the coordination of thought fragments.

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Arrows were made improvisationally. A tutorial was written by team member Jenna and can be found HERE.

In accordance to the challenge guidelines, we forsook a traditional block format and rather used negative space and variable framing to give our arrows an alternate grid.

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This quilt was long-arm quilted by member Lynn Harris of The Little Red Hen.

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Our other group used their skills following the beautiful Think Positive pattern written by A2MQG member Debbie Grifka.

Team members made gorgeous plus blocks that were then assembled into a stunning quilt top.