QuiltCon 2017 Charity Quilt Challenge

The QuiltCon Charity Challenge is one of the MQG’s largest-scale charity projects, and we look forward to getting as many member guilds and individual members involved as possible.

The QuiltCon Charity Quilt Challenge is open to MEMBERS ONLY. Become a member today!

Guilds will donate the finished quilt to their local communities! After the quilts are displayed at QuiltCon, guilds are asked to donate the completed quilt to a local charity your guild supports.

The 2017 QuiltCon Charity Quilt Challenge is a bit different from the 2016 QuiltCon Charity Quilt Challenge. Please read carefully.

This year’s challenge requires participants to work collaboratively to create completed quilts using a predetermined color palette while crafting a design that plays with scale.

About the Challenge

Working with the Color Palette

The color palette can be described as:

Quiltcon Charity Quilt Palette 2017See a complete list of coordinating solid fabrics at quiltcon.com.

Once you have some of these solids on hand, it is easy to pull prints from your stash that coordinate. Yes, you can use prints! If your group prefers, it can be all prints. When choosing prints, it’s best to look for monochromatic/tone-on-tone prints rather than those that include other colors outside the color palette. No additional neutrals are permitted, only those included in the color palette.

Playing with Scale and How to Use It

Carefully chosen guidelines are so important when working with a group. Start your planning with a brainstorming session where all members can contribute ideas. If everyone feels invested in the plan, there will be better follow through. Consider not only the theme, but also how to best use the color palette and keep the other MQG aesthetics in mind as well. Nominate a Project Manager (see below for more on that) and make sure that person will be available through QuiltCon 2017 to receive and follow through with emails regarding the challenge.

Fly Away by Heather Jones

Fly Away by Heather Jones

You could decide to go with large-scale piecing. The overall design would be created with large pieces of fabric and a simple overall design. This might mean designing a quilt with one large block balanced in negative space. Heather Jones uses large-scale piecing in many of her designs. Check out her website for inspiration.

Untitled by Lindsay Stead

Untitled by Lindsay Stead

Lindsay Stead’s 2015 QuiltCon entry is another great example of large-scale piecing.

Log Cabin WIP by Chawne Kimber

Log Cabin WIP by Chawne Kimber

Or, you could go the opposite way and make blocks with very tiny pieces. This type of scale play is very popular right now. Chawne Kimber has made many modern quilts crafted from tiny (1/4”!) pieces. Please visit her website as well.

i Quilt by Kathy York

i Quilt by Kathy York

You could use multiple sizes of the same block in your quilt design. The Quilt Con 2015 Best in Show winner, Kathy York’s “i Quilt” is a great example.

Emergent by Kari Vojtechovsky

Emergent by Kari Vojtechovsky

Emergent by Kari Vojechovsky uses a combination of large scale piecing and smaller piecing in one cohesive design.

If you want to incorporate prints into your quilt design, you could choose prints with the same graphic element in different sizes. For example, one fabric might have 4-inch circles, another might have circles that are a half inch in diameter. You could scale right down to the pindots. Careful fabric choice is important here to make sure the scale change is obvious and an important part of the overall quilt design.

Pixel Pusher II by Caro Sheridan

Pixel Pusher II by Caro Sheridan

You might also think about pixelation. Pixelation and scale are closely related, especially when cropping comes into play. Pixelation can be the magnification of an object rather than the way most people think of it as low resolution.

Pixelation and scale are very closely involved especially when cropping comes into play. Pixelation can be the magnification of object rather than the way most people use it as low-res.

Resources

Organizing Your Guild’s Challenge

Determine Your Guild’s Project Manager

When you begin discussing this challenge with your guild, we ask that you nominate a QuiltCon Charity Quilt project manager for your guild. She/he will be the point of contact for direct communication between the MQG and your guild. She/he should be the person who signs the guild up for the challenge, oversees the project to make sure things are on schedule, and mails the quilt to QuiltCon. All emails sent about the challenge will be sent to this contact person only. That means that the project manager is responsible for communicating to the guild.

Sign-ups

  • Guilds: Project managers for local guilds can use this form to sign up their guild. Please make sure this is filled out by July 30, 2016. Please have your QuiltCon Charity Quilt project manager sign up.
  • Individual member teams: Individual Members Teams (IMTs) should select a leader who will be the only point of contact for the team. Individual members should sign up by May 15, 2016. IMTs can be formed in two ways:
    • Form their own group: If you want to create your own individual member group, please email Deborah Fisher and provide her with a name for your team and the names and email addresses of the two individuals who will be points of contact for your IMT.
    • Be assigned a group: If you want to be linked up with other members, fill out the form we will be sending via email soon. We will work to get groups together according to zip code and/or country to keep your traveling/shipping costs low.

Design the quilt!

  • Guilds, groups and/or individuals will complete a quilt using the predetermined color palette.
  • Guilds, groups and/or will complete a quilt playing with scale.
  • Patterns are allowed but you must credit the designer and obtain their permission in advance.

Work Together

  • Your guild and/or members will provide the blocks for the quilt.
  • Your guild will provide batting, backing, binding and additional fabric to complete the quilt top.
  • Quilts should be twin size (generally no smaller than 68”x 88” and not much bigger than 72” x 92”).
  • Quilting must be no farther apart than 2”. These quilts will be used, so please make sure they are sturdy.
  • Machine sewn bindings are okay.

Blog Post (optional)

  • Your guild will submit an optional blog post with 3–4 accompanying photos discussing the process of designing and completing your guild’s quilt by January 14, 2017.
  • We will email directions to participating guilds on submitting your content in October 2016.

Shipping

All quilts must have a sleeve and label.

  • Label: Each charity quilt sent must have a label securely attached to the back of the quilt. We expect that this is a temporary label that you will take off before donating the quilt to your charity. The label should identify your guild/group and contain the return shipping address.
  • Sleeve: Quilts will be hung with sleeves. Charity quilts require 4” sleeves. Quilts received without sleeves will not be hung. We suggest attaching the sleeve in very big stitches, so that it can be removed before sending to the charity, if applicable. Please review Jacquie Gering’s tutorial on how to make and apply a sleeve to your quilt.

The deadline for these quilts is February 3, 2017.

  • Complete details on shipping will be emailed to your project manager in December 2016.
  • If you need help, please visit the Community site or feel free to email our QuiltCon Charity Quilt Challenge Coordinator, Amy Friend.

Thank you for your interest in completing the QuiltCon 2017 Charity Quilt Challenge. If you or your guild are interested in becoming a part of the MQG, read about membership here!

QuiltCon Charity Quilt Spotlight: “Controlled Chaos” by the New Hampshire MQG

By Marie Joerger, VP; and Susie Boots, Technology

The NHMQG decided to participate in the MQG charity challenge, so the committee chose Michael Miller’s color palette to meet the challenge requirements. The decision was made to use bright white and soft white as the background colors and aqua as the main feature color, with touches of gray, gold and a hint of red.

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Where to start with an improv quilt? The co-chairs met and decided to incorporate two improv techniques that they could share with guild members. Packets were handed out at a meeting for members to complete two different types of blocks — one block style of made fabric and the other of 6” squares using the stitch and flip method.

Once we received the blocks back, we had a small group get-together to decide how to use the made fabric and blocks.

Using the design wall, we came up with a plan to piece the made fabric into larger pieces and added borders to these. With these squares, we created nine patches, while the remaining squares were scattered throughout the rest of the quilt.

We started cutting background pieces to fill in the space between the blocks that had been made. With lots of trial and error, our group worked the quilt from top to bottom. About halfway down we realized there was too much negative space on top. The decision was made to make appliqué circle blocks to fill in the negative space.

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Once the circles were placed, the thought came to add more shapes. Triangles were made in different sizes, then one landed on top of a rectangle, and an arrow was formed! The top was complete and off to the volunteer long arm quilter, Lisa Teichmann, of Garden Gate Quilting. Excitedly, we received bits of communication on the progress of the custom quilting. In the meantime, the charity committee created the pieced binding.

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Finally, when the quilt was received back with all the beautiful dense custom quilting, the process of blocking began. Once blocked and trimmed, the binding was added.

One of our members hand stitched the binding down. Then the sleeve and label were added. Now our toughest challenge of all will be finding the right audience to donate the quilt to. Any suggestions?

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Would we do this again? Yes!
See ya next year!
Co-Chairs,
Marie Joerger and Susie Boots

MQG Exhibit at the Texas Quilt Museum

Thank you to everyone at the Texas Quilt Museum for hosting the MQG’s first-ever juried quilt exhibit. It was a huge success, and we were thrilled to be part of an exhibit at a internationally recognized quilt museum. Special thanks also to our exclusive sponsor, EZ Quilting.

See some of the featured quilts in the photos below!

Half Square #2 by Tara Faughnan

From right to left: Half Square #2 by Tara Faughnan, Individual Member; sticks&bricks by Laura Geiser, DC MQG; Irish Chain Variation by Amy Friend, Seacoast MQG

Rainbow Cloud Quilt by Sherri LynnWood, Individual Member

Rainbow Cloud Quilt by Sherri Lynn Wood, Individual Member

Irish Chain Variation by Amy Friend

From left to right: Irish Chain Variation by Amy Friend, Seacoast MQG; sticks&bricks by Laura Geiser, DC MQG; Half Square #2 by Tara Faughnan, Individual Member

Cabana by Sheri Cifaldi-Morrill

From right to left: Cabana by Sheri Cifaldi-Morrill, Southern Connecticut MQG; Summer Reading by Timna Tarr, Northampton MQG; Delilah by Emily Cier, Seattle MQG; Color Play by Victoria Findlay Wolfe, Individual Member

Color Play by Victoria Findlay Wolfe, Individual Member

Color Play by Victoria Findlay Wolfe, Individual Member

Top: Dance Party at Tamara's House by Maria Shell, Individual Member; Bottom: Easy Does It by Lynne Mackay-Atha, DC MQG

Top: Dance Party at Tamara’s House by Maria Shell, Individual Member; Bottom: Easy Does It by Lynne Mackay-Atha, DC MQG

Austin House #3 by Carolyn Friedlander, Individual Member

From left to right: Austin House #3 by Carolyn Friedlander, Individual Member; Let’s Play by Doris Carr, Kansas City MQG; Sarasota Sunset #3 by Carole Lyles Shaw, Sarasota MQG; Color Play by Victoria Findlay Wolfe, Individual Member

Leslie Tucker Jenison gives an impromptu talk at the Texas Quilt Museum.

Leslie Tucker Jenison, San Antonio MQG Member, gives an impromptu talk at the Texas Quilt Museum.

Leslie Tucker Jenison talks about her quilt, Aerial Geometry. Leslie is a member of the San Antonio MQG.

Leslie Tucker Jenison talks about her quilt, Aerial Geometry.

QuiltCon Charity Spotlight: “Louisiana: Oh What a State We’re In!” by the Quilters’ Guild Acadienne/Mod Squad

By Amy Aderman (Membership Committee Co-chair), Jonelle Archibald (Chair) and Ken Broussard (member)

Our Mod Squad is a modern quilting interest group comprised of individual members of the Modern Quilt Guild. We are all members of Quilters’ Guild Acadienne, a 25-year-old traditional guild. We saw this challenge as an opportunity to expose our traditional quilters to the world of modern quilting. We invited all guild members to participate. Quilters of all levels, most of whom were new to modern quilting, accepted. With little or no knowledge of how to begin, we began. 

pieced_charityAs a group, we watched the webinar, “Improv with Intent,” browsed galleries of modern quilts, and discussed how traditional concepts, techniques, and designs can be adapted for modern quilting. Since most of us were modern quilting newbies, we decided to collaborate by sharing ideas, teaching and learning from others. Our number-one priority was for our collaboration to be a fun, social learning process. Working alongside intermediate and advanced quilters, novices soaked up tips, techniques and confidence. They shared their own knowledge as well, and everyone grew from this exciting collaboration.

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The webinar, inspirational photos and state maps led to a brainstorming session for determining our intent. We decided that we would represent various aspects of our beautiful state, and then connect them all with the winding river. We started with a very rough sketch of the concept. At each sewing session thereafter, team members used his or her imagination to create landmarks, memories, and representational pieces in both abstract and realistic designs. The prescribed color palette, at first a challenge, soon became a source of fun and whimsy, spurring our imaginations. 

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When you view our quilt, visualize the scenes along the Mississippi and its tributaries. Can you find rice fields, crawfish ponds, a shrimp boat and an oil rig? Can you feel the joie de vivre in the vibrant rhythm of jazz and zydeco? Our state flower, bird, tree, and insect each have a place. The tranquility of the rural areas and the energy of the urban scenes flow around each other as one might discover Louisiana.

Whether you’ve lived in Louisiana your whole life, are a transplant from somewhere else, or even a visitor, you can’t help but be inspired.  Just as threads bind the various pieces of a quilt together, the mighty Mississippi is a source of energy stitching together all aspects of our lives: connecting, enriching, sustaining, feeding, and binding us all. 

The Charity Quilt Challenge has stirred the pot within our guild, challenging traditional members — both novices and experts — to taste a genre perhaps unfamiliar to them. We’ve added spice to our pot and a new flavor to our already-rich gumbo.

Mod Squad Charity Quilt Challenge Members (listed alphabetically)
Amy Aderman, Beth Andrepont, Jonelle Archibald, Kenneth Broussard, Nadine Cain, Linda Ducotey, Judy Garber, Beth Glass, Stella Guidry, Marty Mason, Diane Redfearn, and Polly Stacks.

QuiltCon Charity Quilt Spotlight: “An Exercise in Trust” by the Denver MQG

By Andrea Berryhill, President

Last year the Modern Quilt Guild threw out a challenge for the 2016 charity quilts to be displayed in Pasadena. The challenge required participants to “work collaboratively to create completed quilts using a predetermined color palette and improv with intent.” Several members of the Denver Metro guild know a thing or two about improv, so we were eager to accept the challenge!

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The first step in our process was to choose a theme around which to construct our quilt so that it would still be cohesive. The theme that was settled on was “Trust.” Specifically, how does trust come into play when making a collaborative quilt?

We trusted the MQG in their choice of colors, which included several neutrals and a few primary colors. Participants were then instructed to make an improvisational block using the neutral colors for their negative space and a simple four-sided shape with the black color trusting that there would be more direction to come. The third step was to put the pieced blocks into a bag, mix them up and draw out new blocks. Those blocks could then be altered using small amounts of the secondary colors using improvisation, curved piecing, slice and insert or whatever moved the maker, trusting the process while working together. Finally, the blocks were laid out with the intention of creating a focal point and some visual interest and movement through the use of the secondary colors and quilting. I think the result is a stunning success!

An interesting point to make is that many of these blocks were turned on their corners in order to create the movement of the smaller secondary colored curves. It was like putting together a puzzle for which there was no picture. There are a lot of Y-seams in this baby!

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Let’s face it, improv can be intimidating for a lot of us quilters. We tend to like order, and lines, and rulers! However, when you quilt with intention, basing your ideas off of a set of guidelines it takes some of the intimidation off the table and turns out to be a lot of fun. We loved seeing how all the blocks, as different as they were, still fit together (in our minds) perfectly! We’re not sure yet where we’ll be donating our quilt, but we hope that it makes the recipient smile.

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The women of the Denver Metro Modern Quilt Guild would like to give the following members thanks for their participation: Andrea Berryhill, Alaina Marler, Marsha Loewenberg, Chelsea O’Hayre, Katie Rapp, Shelby Skumanich, Rosalynda Turner, Amy Wade, and Emily Voytek. We would like to especially thank Stephanie Ruyle for trusting us with an amazing design concept and working on final construction, Wendy Bermingham and Christine Perrigo for the many hours of assembly, creating the back and the amazing quilting, Susan Sanstistevan for heading up the committee and Judy Sanclaria for binding the quilt. What a beautiful collaboration!

QuiltCon Charity Quilt Spotlight: Riverfire by the Brisbane MQG

By Victoria Mansfield, Committee Member

Participating in this challenge was my idea and fortunately, after floating the idea, I immediately had the support of the guild and was nominated to be the Project Leader. The first step, as always, is to come up with a plan, and since the Storey Bridge is the logo of the Brisbane MQG (BMQG) it was my first suggestion. Another member then suggested the bridge with fireworks, and that was it — we had our idea!

Riverfire_final

“Riverfire” is the finale event to the annual Brisbane Festival and is a huge fireworks display along the section of the Brisbane River which winds its way through the CBD, with the Storey Bridge being a massive feature of this display. Almost everyone in Brisbane has attended at least one Riverfire, and the event holds a special place in all of our hearts. The Storey Bridge also turned 75 in July 2015, right at the time we were coming up with our plan. Brisbane, by world standards, is a relatively young city and has very few noteworthy architectural features. The Storey Bridge is one of our most recognised structures and we wanted to help celebrate it turning 75!

The next step was to come up with a type of quilt that would be able to include any member who wished to contribute.  We therefore thought smaller blocks would be the best option and liked the idea that this would pixelate the image. The quilt consists of 414 improv wonky log cabin style blocks 4½”. Twelve members made blocks, with a special mention to Janet Jackson, Jenny Cameron and Kirsty Cleverly, who between them made nearly 200 blocks.

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BMQG held its first annual retreat in October 2015, and one of the retreat missions was to get the last 50 or so blocks made and to work on the final layout. It was fantastic to have input on the layout from all on retreat, which helped make this quilt even better! After assembling the top, we chose quilting to amplify the fireworks and make them the main feature of the quilt. The bridge quilting was done with a walking foot on a domestic machine and the sky, water and fireworks were all done on a Sweet 16.

Bridge_quilting

I loved the collaborative process we went through as a guild to create this quilt and how much it brought us all together. The creativity of our members is a massive inspiration to me personally and to the guild as a group, and I want to thank the MQG for bringing us together! 

As Project Leader, I also want to thank all the members of the BMQG for their contributions to this project and for helping to make our guild so amazing! 

Our chosen charity is a Domestic Violence Shelter run by The Salvation Army.  We have donated 33 quilts to them over the last year, with many more in the process of being created and hope they provide some comfort in a time of need.

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QuiltCon Charity Quilt Spotlight: Flying Colors by Anita Lahay

By Anita Lahay, Individual Member

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My QuiltCon Charity quilt “Flying Colors” is inspired by the Hindu Holi Festival. As soon as I saw the color palette I immediately thought of the colored corn starch powders flying through the air. I started searching on the Internet for photos of the festival. In North America there are also “color runs” where people throw colored powders as well. The website for the Calgary color run says it is a race that “celebrates healthiness, happiness and individuality.”

I used improv with intent to convey the colors flying out from the bottom left side of the quilt. My main improv choice was slash-and-insert to show movement and direction. The movement of the powders is continued across the quilt with colored thread. There are ribbons, circles indicating powder clumps and particles, arrows and clouds of powder filling the white space of the quilt. The grey fabric indicates the streets people are running and celebrating on.

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When I was piecing the quilt, I originally planned to have the colors running from left to right (blue, red, yellow) along the bottom edge of the quilt and exploding upwards, but when I turned the top sideways to press seams I realized I liked that much better. Since I was free in the improvisational technique to do whatever I wanted, I changed my layout plan halfway through.

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I thought about what happens after the runs and the festival. People would need to wash the colored powders off of their skin. The three large bars in the top left of the quilt are quilted with big drips to show the colors dripping off of people. Immediately below the bars the drips continue in threads of corresponding colors. There are more water drops and more drips quilted with white in the space below the three large bars.

The majority of the white space is filled in with white cloud quilting to represent the clouds of powder in the air and the breath being expelled by the people running.

My favorite part of the challenge was searching for inspiration photos and the quilting after it was pieced. I have never made an “improv with intent” quilt before, and I found myself improvising the quilting too. I would look at an area on the quilt and just let it speak to me with what I should fill in there with thread. The clouds were an area where I could let my mind wander while quilting them. It was a freeing and fun process and definitely took me outside my usual box.

I plan to donate this quilt to the Alberta Cancer Foundation after losing my Aunt Valorie Weir to cancer on Christmas day December 25, 2015.

QuiltCon Charity Quilt Spotlight: Kansas City MQG

Completed Quilt 2

The creation of the Kansas City Modern Quilt Guild QuiltCon 2016 charity quilt, Strata Steps, was truly a group effort. The guild asked members to complete improv strata blocks using one focus color from the list of provided colors. Blocks had to be at least 12” x 12”.

During the presentation of how the guild would be approaching the challenge, Community Service Committee Chair Kristin Marciniak made the tactical error of pointing out that lime green was not one of the MQG-approved colors. She would live to regret that, as the rest of the meeting was peppered with questions like, “What about lime green? Can we use that color?” and “Wait, so the blocks are supposed to be entirely lime green?”

Blocks

Members posted on the guild Facebook group as they created their strata blocks and turned them in at the next couple of guild meetings. The KCMQG knows how to keep a joke going, so the threads were filled with lime green jokes and questions. But the more than 20 blocks collected fit the MQG’s color guidelines to a T. (The bag of blocks Kristin received from cheeky friends was another story altogether.)

Top in progress

Members then met at a Community Service Committee sewing day to help determine how to put the blocks together into a quilt top. During the sew day, Kristin and Jaime David posted a picture of the strata blocks on the guild Facebook group to let other members weigh in on how to put the top together. A few recommendations were made and, of course, members made sure to point out the lack of lime green blocks in the photo. Making a decision was harder than we thought, and by the end of the day, a quilt top was still not completed.

Luckily Jacquie Gering volunteered to take the blocks and create a quilt top. With some creative advice from Kim Eichler-Messmer, Jaime, and Denise Best, and some Kona Sunny, Rich Red, and Yarn-Dyed Essex in Black, we had a quilt top! Paula Leber put together the backing for the quilt and Denise quilted it with her long arm. It was then handed off to Shea Henderson for binding and sleeve and label creation. Shea transferred it to Jessica Toye to bring to the January guild meeting where Lesley Latham took over for this blog post and shipping.

Back

Label ready for labeling

There were quite a few steps and people involved for this quilt to exist, but it was worth it for the oohs and ahhs when the finished quilt was presented to the members during Show & Tell at the January meeting. Thank you to everyone who contributed blocks and/or helped with each step of the creation process. And next year, we’re voting for lime green.

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Thank you to our QuiltCon sponsors!

Thank you so much to our amazing sponsors for helping make QuiltCon possible! We couldn’t do this show without you, and we truly, deeply appreciate your generosity. You mean the world to us!

Northcott

Northcott, Platinum Sponsor

Handi Quilter

Handi Quilter, Platinum Sponsor

Baby Lock

Baby Lock, Platinum Sponsor

Robert Kaufman

Robert Kaufman, Platinum Sponsor

FreeSpirit

FreeSpirit, Platinum Sponsor

Craft South

Craft South, Platinum Sponsor

Moda

Moda, Platinum Sponsor

Bernina

Bernina, Platinum Sponsor

Stash Books

Stash Books, Platinum Sponsor

Riley Blake Designs

Riley Blake Designs, Platinum Sponsor

Michael Miller Fabrics

Michael Miller Fabrics, Platinum Sponsor

Janome

Janome, Platinum Sponsor

Thank you everyone! See you in Savannah!

Congratulations to our QuiltCon 2016 winners!

The competition was fierce this year, but these quilts stood above the rest. Congratulations to our 2016 QuiltCon winners!

Best in show

My Brother’s Jeans
Pieced & quilted by Melissa Averinos
Individual Member
@melissaaverinos
84” x 91”

averinos_my_overall_1603

Machine Quilting, Framed

No Value Does Not Equal Free
Pieced by Molli Sparkles, quilted by Jane Davidson
Individual Member
@molli_sparkles
72” x 72”

sparkles_no_overall_348

Machine Quilting, Frameless

ABQMQG
Logo designed by Bob Lowe
Pieced by Lois Warwick
Applique by Sally Williams & Laurie Moodie
Quilting by Renee Hoffman
Albuquerque MQG
86” x 45”

hoffman_abqmqg_overall_1406

Freespirit Quilting Excellence

The Other Side
Pieced & quilted by Carson Converse
Northampton MQG
59” x 57”

converse_the_overall_1712

Judge’s Choice – Cheryl Arkison

Better Together
Pieced & quilted by Laura West Kong
Individual Member
@laurawestkong

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People’s Choice & Judge’s Choice – Scott Murkin

Mr. Swirl E. Bones
Pieced by Victoria Findlay Wolfe, quilted by Shelly Pagliai
Individual Member
@victoriafindlaywolfe
94” x 94”

findlay_wolfe_mr._overall_700

Judge’s Choice – Lisa

Red Hot
Pieced & quilted by Shawna Doering
Individual Member
@thequilticorn
55” x 66”

doering_red_overall_1897

Applique – 1st

DripnSplash
Pieced & quilted by
Katherine Jones
Tasmanian MQG
84” x 60”

jones_dripnsplash_overall_906

Applique – 2nd

Ebb
Pieced & quilted by Carolyn Friedlander
Individual Member
@carolynfriedlander
41” x 36″

friedlander_ebb_overall_723

Applique – 3rd

Cut & Keep
Pieced & quilted by Gina Pina
Austin MQG
@gina_pina
37” x 44”

pina_cut_overall_1930

EZ Triangle Challenge – 1st

Eichler Homes
Pieced by Mickey Beebe
Quilted by Tami Levin, the Quilted Lemon
South Bay Area MQG
66” x 76”

beebe_eichler_overall_629

EZ Triangle Challenge – 2nd

Catnado
Pieced & quilted by Karen Duling
Individual Member
@karenbduling
56” x 61”

duling_catnado_overall_257

EZ Triangle Challenge – 3rd

Facets
Pieced & quilted by Katherine Jones
Tasmanian MQG
25” x 37”

jones_facets_overall_912

Group or Bee Quilts – 1st

Mod Mood
Pieced by Debbie Jeske, Stephanie Ruyle, Leanne Chahley, Karen Foster, Felicity Ronaghan, Kari Vojtechovsky, Melissa Richie, Diane Stanley, Marci Debetaz, Hillary Goodwin
Quilted by Debbie Jeske
62” x 65”

jeske_mod_overall_554

Group or Bee Quilts – 2nd

Pathways
Pieced by Janet Schoenfeld, Summer Rankin, Elaine Wienholt, Cindy Barcelles, Deb Kleiner, Judy Dunlap
Quilted by Maria O’Haver
Baltimore MQG
77” x 73”

schoenfeld_pathways_overall_1240

Group or Bee Quilts – 3rd

Twisted Sisters Quilt
Pieced by Stephanie Ruyle, Christine Perrigo, Wendy Bermingham, Amy Wade, Chelsea Camalick, Sheri Nichols, Michelle Davis, Wendy Roth, Teri Ladtkow, Susan Santisteven, Charlayne Dunn, Shelby Skumanich, Andrea Berryhill, Teresa Barbagallo, Lauren Lang, Dena Mehling, Anne deister, Katie Rapp, Carla Keahey, Marsha Loewenbery, Judy Sanclaria, Heather Ferguson)
Quilted by Wendy Bermingham, Christine Perrigo
Denver Metro MQG
78” x 88”

87twistedsisters

Handwork – 1st

Places Unfold
Pieced & quilted by Heidi Parkes
Individual Member
@heidi.parkes
59” x 59”

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Handwork – 2nd

Double Wedding Ring
Pieced & quilted by Tara Faughnan
Individual Member
@tarafaughnan
78” x 78”

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Handwork – 3rd

Mod Mountains
Pieced & quilted by Susanne Williams
Individual Member
@suzyquilts
50” x 64”

williams_mod_overall_484

Improvisation – 1st

The One For Eric
Pieced by Chawne Kimber
Hand quilting by Chawne Kimber, longarm machine quilting by Pamela J. Cole
Individual Member
@cauchycomplete
79” x 77”

kimber_the_overall_900

Improvisation – 2nd

Night Flight no. 1
Pieced & quilted by Heidi Parkes
Individual Member
@heidi.parkes
58” x 58”

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Improvisation – 3rd

Colorfall
Pieced & quilted by Timna Tarr
Northampton MQG
@timnatarr
49” x 54”

Colorfall

Michael Miller Challenge – 1st

The Stars Dream of Snow
Pieced & quilted by Kari Anderson
Los Angeles MQG
@Andersondesignworks
62” x 58”

anderson_the_overall_832

Michael Miller Challenge – 2nd

Pineapple Glitz
Pieced & quilted by Susan Slusser Clay
Individual Member
@slusclay
62” x 62”

slusser_clay_pineapple_overall_1422

Michael Miller Challenge – 3rd

Better Together
Pieced & quilted by Laura West Kong
Individual Member
@laurawestkong
54” x 54”

west_kong_better_overall_1838

Minimalist Design – 1st

Bubble Gum
Pieced & quilted by Margaret (Kathy) Greer
Bainbridge Island MQG
58” x 72”

greer_bubble_overall_1121

Minimalist Design – 2nd

Shift
Pieced & quilted by Carson Converse
Northampton MQG
37.5” x 41”

converse_shift_overall_1602

Minimalist Design – 3rd

Rainy Day Quilt
Pieced by Lindsey Neill
Quilted by Sarah Wilson from Crinklelove
Phoenix MQG
@penandpaperpatterns
56” x 72”

SONY DSC

Modern Traditionalism – 1st

Whimsical Logs
Pieced by Letitia Chung
Machine quilted by Laurie Grant
Sashiko by Letitia Chung
Individual Member
66” x 67”

261whimsicallogs

Modern Traditionalism – 2nd

Flounce
Pieced & quilted by Melanie Tuazon
North Jersey MQG
@melintheattic
52” x 57”

tuazon_flounce_overall_315

Modern Traditionalism – 3rd

Release the Geese II
Pieced by Sarah Bond
Quilted by Carol Heisler, Norriton, Pennsylvania
Philadelphia MQG
@slbphilly
94” x 94”

www.id-photo-app.com

Piecing – 1st

Under the Radar
Pieced & quilted by Corinne Sovey
Austin MQG
@mustlovequilts
47.8” x 65”

UndertheRadar

Piecing – 2nd

Pointed Statement
Pieced & quilted by Amy Friend
Seacoast MQG
@duringquiettime
48” x 60”

friend_pointed_overall_78

Piecing – 3rd

Diamonds Quilt #2
Pieced & quilted by Tara Faughnan
Individual Member
@tarafaughnan
59” x 69”

faughnan_diamonds_overall_310

Small Quilts – 1st

Modern Improv Sampler
Pieced & quilted by Kristin Shields
Central Oregon MQG
@kristinshields
17” x 24”

shields_modern_overall_579

Small Quilts – 2nd

Lines Lost & Found
Pieced & quilted by Jennifer Rossotti
Individual Member
@jennrossotti
35” x 28”

rossotti_lines_overall_303

Small Quilts – 3rd

Holyoke 1938
Pieced & quilted by Timna Tarr
Northampton MQG
@timnatarr
22” x 29”

Holyoke 1938

Use of Negative Space – 1st

Reflection
Pieced by Nancy Purvis
Quilted by Mary Gregory
Triangle MQG
@owensolivia
37” x 47”

purvis_reflection_overall_1059

Use of Negative Space – 2nd

Horseshoes and Hand Grenades
Pieced & quilted by Rebecca Burnett
Toronto MQG
@duzzabear
63” x 85”

burnett_horseshoes_overall_1253

Use of Negative Space – 3rd

Catching Up
Pieced by Kathryn Simel
Quilted by Stacey Bendure
Maine MQG
@midcoastcottagedesign
68” x 84”

182catchingup

Youth – 1st

Ka-Bloom
Pieced & quilted by Sofia Locke
Sydney MQG
@craftypanda55
51” x 51”

locke_ka-bloom_overall_1302

Youth – 2nd

Hearts Desire
Pieced by Autumn Overton
Quilted by Autumn Overton & her teacher Mrs. Goodman
Junior MQG of Broward County
57” x 94”

overton_hearts_overall_1069

Youth – 3rd

Modern Harris
Pieced & quilted by Alexus Upitis
Calgary MQG
41” x 43”

1895modernharris