MQG Showcase at the International Quilt Festival

One of the great perks of going to Quilt Market for work is getting the first peek at the MQG Show case at the International Quilt Festival! We have a stellar show this year with lots of diverse modern quilts.

Christa did a great wrap up of of the Modern Quilt Guild Showcase at the International Quilt Festival, showing each individual quilt. The photos below give you a nice overview on how the show looks and feels.

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Fade Into Gray by Stephanie Ruyle and Anni Albers’ Orange Chair by Martha Peterson

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Cycles 2 by Leanne Chahley, Sunburst Quilt by Tara Faughnan, and Homage by Jacquie Gering

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Funky Junk by Renee Tallman and Las Ventanas by Kristin Shields

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Fissures by Debra Jeske, Entropy by Elisa Albury, and Pixel Pusher II Caro Sheridan

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Citrus Wedge by Jen Carlton-Bailly

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Disruption by Barbara Lockwood, STAR’D by Kristy Daum, and Boxed In by Elizabeth Dackson

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Namaste by Cheryl Olson and The White Rainbow by Shruti Dandekar

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Broken Bars by Rebecca Roach and Melon Ice by Amy Friend

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Tune In Next Week by Chawne Kimber, Quilted by Pamela Cole, City Center by Angie Henderson, and Folded Flock by Jenna Brand

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Spiraling Out of Control by Christa Watson, Pick Up Sticks by Becky Goldsmith, Avalon Sunrise by Colleen Wootton, and Blue Circle Quilt by Kim Eichler-Messmer

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Colorado 4×4 by Stephanie Ruyle, Amazonia by Nathalie Bearden, Off Center by Charlotte Noll, and Summer Break by Amy Anderson

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Back to Basics by Melissa Corry, Modern X by Christa Watson, and Grand Canal by Casey York, Quilted by Ann McNew

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Grand Canal by Casey York, Quilted by Ann McNew, Didn’t Get the Memo by Alissa Haight Carlton, and Spiced Chai Quilt by Katie Blakesley

Sewciety + QuiltCon: Volunteering!

This is the final podcast in a four part series. The other posts can be found herehere, and here.

In the final episode with Stephanie at Modern Sewciety the conversation centers around volunteering at QuiltCon. Listen in how you can volunteer at QuiltCon. There are also some good tips for volunteers!

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Are you or your guild interested in becoming a part of the MQG?
Read about membership here.

Sewciety + QuiltCon: The Experience

This is the third podcast in a four part series. The other posts can be found here, and here.

This episode with Stephanie at Modern Sewciety is all about getting the most from your experience. Listen in to get some great tips from Jen Carlton Bailly, Susan Beal, and Andrew Joslyn. They talk about everything from what to bring to how to schedule your days!

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Are you or your guild interested in becoming a part of the MQG?
Read about membership here.

Sewciety + QuiltCon: Workshops and Lectures

This is the second podcast in a four part series. The first one can be found here.

The next episode with Stephanie at Modern Sewciety is all about the experience with workshops and lectures at QuiltConElizabeth Dackson, MQG Events Manager, chats about how to prepare for the classes and a bit about what to expect when taking lectures and workshop. Cheryl Arkison and Carolyn Friedlander talk about the experience of taking workshop and lectures at QuiltCon. Don’t miss out on some great tips given by all!

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Are you or your guild interested in becoming a part of the MQG?
Read about membership here.

MQG Members in the News!

One of the great benefits of becoming a member of the MQG is our free Quilt of the Month patterns. Each month MQG members are sent via email a modern quilt pattern designed by one of our talented members!

In February, Paige Alexander (an Individual member from South Carolina) fell in love with Debbie Grifka’s (a member of the Ann Arbor MQG) Zephyr pattern. Below is a great interview with AQS about her quilt Variegated, which received honorable mention the Modern category. Her quilting was inspired by a post written by Christina Cameli, a member of the Portland MQG.

Congrats Paige! We are so excited to for your win.

Are you or your guild interested in becoming a part of the MQG?

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QuiltCon Charity Quilt: Alternative Gridwork

We  hope you have already read all about the 2015 QuiltCon Charity Quilt Challenge and are planning to join in! If you missed reading about it, you can find the original post here, and the Color post here.

The QuiltCon Charity Quilt Challenge is one of the MQG’s largest-scale charity projects. For QuiltCon 2015 guilds are asked to follow a predetermined color palette and alternate grid work design.

As quilters we are often (but not always) naturally forced into grids based on our construction techniques. In this post, we’ll talk about different forms of grid work and how to consider using them in your charity quilt design.

Alternate grid work is a modern quilting design element that is used frequently by modern quilters. It is often one of the easiest design elements to experiment and explore modern quilt making with. Modern quilters often “break the grid”. Alternate grid work is a tool to help showcase modern quilting design fundamentals such as negative space, no borders, minimalism, asymmetry, modern traditionalism and exaggerated scale.

Alternate grid work in modern quilt making refers to quilts that don’t follow the traditional block format of many quilts. The majority (but not all) of traditional quilt styles follow a predictable grid structure. It’s important to note that some modern quilts DO follow traditional quilt grid work and some traditional quilts do NOT follow traditional quilt grid work.

Traditional Grid Work Examples

The Straight Set – columns and rows of repeating blocks.

On Point – columns and rows of repeating blocks on a 45 degree angle

Medallion – a central focus feature with design elements bordering outward.

Credit: Marcelle Medallion Quilt by Alexia Abegg

Alternate Grid Work Examples

Traditional grids can be adapted or altered beyond the normal repeating columns and rows.

Increasing negative space.

Shifting the on point angle to an atypical degree.

Alternate gridwork refers to the underlying grids. As quilters, our seam lines guide our grids. Here are some examples of alternate grids.

Modular Grids are the basis for a vast majority of quilt design. You can use a modular grid, but don’t follow strict columns and rows. Using scale is a great way to use a modular grid in an alternate way.

Adding negative space is another way to use the modular grid in an alternate way.

Variable Framing uses the modular grid, but floats blocks in negative space. The underlying column and row format is there, but utilizes negative space to make it modern.

Offset or Misaligned Grids shift the rows and columns to offset blocks.

Paneling does not follow a modular grid structure and disguises any underlying grid.

Are you really into grids? Here’s some great reading:

Grids for Graphic Designers:

The Designer’s Guide to Grid Theory

Grid-Based Design Theory

Five Simple Steps to Designing Grid Systems

A Brief History of Grids

Books:

Making and Breaking the Grid by Timothy Samara

Geometry of Design

The Alternate Grid Chapter by Jacquie Gering, Essential Guide to Modern Quilt Making, Lucky Spool

General Design Books:

Design Basics by David Lauer and Stephen Pentak

Design Elements by Timothy Samara

Applying Mathematics to Web Design 

Understanding the Impact of Design:

A great book to understand how forms impact and are processed by the human brain is Sensation and Perception by E. Bruce Goldstein. This book was the first book that really got me to think about design in an objective rather than intuitive manner. Have fun everyone!

Thanks,

Heather Grant, Director of Marketing & Programming

QuiltCon Charity Challenge: COLOR!

We  hope you have already read all about the 2015 QuiltCon Charity Quilt Challenge and are planning to join in! If you missed reading about it, you can find the original blog post here.

Post by Amy Friend, QuiltCon Charity Challenge Project Manager:

Today, we will talk a little bit more about the color palette. I hope you are excited about these colors and want to help you locate them in your stashes and in your local quilt shops.

The color palette can be described as white, light gray, chartreuse, burnt orange, sky blue, cerise and a deep turquoise.  No, you don’t need to use all of the colors, you can be selective if you prefer. You do not need to use the fabrics listed by the manufacturer’s below but seeking out some of these solids might help you pin down the color palette.  

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If you are using Kona solids by Robert Kaufman, the best choices are:  Snow, Shadow, Wasabi, Cedar, Bahama Blue, Cerise and Glacier.

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Bleached White, Bunny Hill Blue, Citrine, Clementine, Capri, Boysenberry and Horizon Blue are your best bets if using Moda’s Bella Solids.

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Michael Miller’s Cotton Couture Solids in Bright White, Fog, Grass, Orange, Malibu, Jewel and Marine are shown in this photograph.

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And although Windham doesn’t have their own line of solids, a number of Marcia Derse’s Palette collection textured solids work well.

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Solids from the Free Spirit Designer Essentials and Denyse Schmidt Modern Solids that match the color palette are: Mist, Silver, Solar, Carrot, Bahamas, Tropical and Baltic (Solar” is temporarily unavailable and not pictured here.)

Once you have some of these solids on hand, it is easy to pull prints from your stash that coordinate.  Yes, you can certainly use prints too!  Here is a collection of prints I had on hand that coordinate with the palette.  As you can see, my stash is weaker in some areas than in others but a trip to the quilt store could solve that problem quickly.

When choosing prints, it is best to look for monochromatic/tone on tone prints rather than those that include other colors since those colors may not be part of this color palette.

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We’ve reached out to fabric shops and shared this palette so that they could make fabric bundles available to you in their shops. That’s an easy way to start gathering your fabric for this project.

The following sponsors have bundles for this challenge:

Cherrywood

Pink Castle Fabric

Pink Chalk Fabrics

Rock Paper Scissors

Sew Modern

The Intrepid Thread 

We hope that this information is helpful. If you have any questions you can post them in the forums on Community here, or feel free to email us at info@themodernquiltguild.com.

 

Are you or your guild interested in becoming a part of the MQG?
Read about membership here.

QuiltCon Quilt Show: The Judging Process

This is post 3 of a series of posts on the QuiltCon Quilt Show.  You can see the first post here and the second post here.

The Judging Process

The MQG has listened carefully to feedback on the judging process at QuiltCon 2013 and we are working to improve the judging experience for our members and the judging process for our judges and volunteers. The MQG is committed to developing a competitive experience that is positive for all involved and which will allow our members to receive feedback which will be encouraging and allow them to set goals for improving their work if they so desire.

A panel of three judges, one of whom will be an NQA certified judge, will conduct the judging process at QuiltCon. The quilts will be judged with an elimination process rather than a points system. Quilts will be organized by category. Each category of quilts will be “fanned”or held up in front of the judges one at a time so that the judges can view each quilt at a distance and get an overall impression of the quilt, evaluate the overall design and see the general appearance. Judges will consider individual design elements and how they have been combined to create an effective, impactful design. The judges will have an evaluation form to use as a guide during judging. We will share the form as soon as it is in its final version, but essentially the quilts will be judged on Design and Composition, Overall Appearance, and Workmanship.

The quilts will then be examined individually, on a flat surface, so that the judges can view the quilt up close and examine workmanship, applique, quilting, edge finishing techniques and visual detail. Quilts can be held up again at the judges’ request. The judges will discuss each quilt as a team and decide on feedback for the quilter that will be written verbatim by a volunteer scribe. The judges at QuiltCon will be asked to give a minimum of three pieces of positive feedback for the quilter and if the judges deem appropriate, constructive feedback which will help the quilter improve.

After a quilt has been examined individually the judges will decide if the quilt will be released or held for a possible award. After all quilts have been judged, the held quilts will be reevaluated as a group and individually to determine the awarding of ribbons. It is at this time that judges may recommend that quilts be held for special awards such as Best Machine Quilting.

Each quilter will receive their feedback sheet from the judges with the return of their quilt. We hope the comments and feedback will be taken in the spirit in which they were intended. No judging process is perfect and final results will vary based on the individuals involved. Every effort will be made to conduct the judging process in a professional, impartial manner.

Please let us know if you have any questions!

The Education Committee